Thursday, April 16, 2009

Daily Fail: The Equation Races Car




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Are you a fan of Speed Racer? I am. I love that show. In particular, I love the goofy names. "Inspector Detector". "Cruncher Block".

..."Trixie."


Anyway, today's bootleg carries on the grand tradition of goofy race car driver names. Today...
The Equation Races Car.




Some failed English translations are easy to correct. Some are trickier. I can't figure out what this toy started out life as, though. This name is wide open to any attempt at meaning you care to apply to it. I like the idea of a driver called "The Equation", so I'm sticking with that. But there are certainly other viewpoints to consider.

For example: Maybe there's a racing circuit called "The Equation Races", sort of like a MENSA version of NASCAR.



The box reveals that this toy is "No. 2001" - making it the first in the set of over sized Zephyr Knight "not quite an impulse set" bootlegs. The toy itself is a poor reproduction of the LEGO set 4590- Flash Racer. Which, if we turn an objective eye to it, also has a very goofy name for a race car driver. (Maybe he's nicknamed "The Streak".)



As part of "Series Transformation", the Equation races three different versions of his car. I think there's also a small matching game presented on the box art...take a closer look at the bottom left corner:



Are we supposed to match up each of the three versions with the "Interesting", "Intelligence" and "Amusement" labels? If so, I'm guessing "Amusement" matches up with the middle model that shows the Equation sitting backwards in the driver's seat as the car flies over some mountains. (Either he's sitting backwards or driving in reverse. Or the art department put the "moving forward" swoosh effect on the wrong side of the tires.)



The side of the package has a bit of clip art showing a very stern looking driver on the left. I think he's pissed to be shown on the same box with the Equation.



Note that the instructions show a different color scheme from the box art - but keep the same non-LEGO-set head choice for the Equation. It's also worth noting how they display the mini-figure. There are inset instructions on how to assemble him - but the full sheet shows the driver replaced with the one-piece "micro driver" from the LEGO set. This becomes important in a bit.




Amazingly, the Zephyr Knight folks duplicated the LEGO pull-back motor part...and it actually works. Not well, mind you. But it does work.



And here's the Equation as he comes packaged. Note the uneven printing and shoddy/mismatched construction values on the blue helmet. The torso is a standard Zephyr Knight print.



Here's the assembled toy. The white "exhaust pipes" in the pack aren't sized correctly and won't stay attached. Shocking, I know.



And here's the Equation sitting on his ride. If Zephyr Knight had used the small "micro-racer" body, he would have been able to drive the thing. As it is, he sits precariously atop the car without any steering or firm attachment point. A disaster waiting to happen.

Hold on..."waiting" to happen? Sadly, the Equation Races Car is already here. There's no more wait. It's a disaster now.

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As always, many thanks to Joe from The Undiscovered Playthings for sending me this set to review.


9 comments:

Cat said...

Maybe it will look right if you just put the torso on the driver's seat, no legs. That's what it looks like they did on the box.

Christopher Doyle said...

Actually, the box uses this piece: http://www.bricklink.com/catalogItem.asp?P=x351 - a "one piece" driver from the Racer sets.

Besides...who would dare remove THE EQUATION's masculinity like that? ;)

Great escaper said...

I had the real (read: LEGO) version of this set, I thought the pull-back function was nifty, quite like the little matchbox type car things I had when I was younger. I wouldn't be surprised if the bootleggers had stolen the moulds for the pullback system, wonder how they copied the internal mechinism though.

Ben said...

Lol... masculinity. if this boot leg had any, it probably wouldnt be attached correctly.

Capt Straw said...

I figured it out, it's not supposed to be "The Equation Races Car" it's a "Formula" Race Car. Well, that's my best guess anyways.

Christopher Doyle said...

@Capt Straw:

Brilliant! I think you cracked the code! I'll update the review in a bit.

Anonymous said...

The T on the Interesting, Intenllegent, Amusment is taken from the Boston subway line. How they got it, nobody knows...

Anonymous said...

Actually, the Equation is, in fact, based on a real person. Judging by his mustache, Adolf Hitler, in fact, survived WWII and became the champion car-racer known as the Equation. It all makes sense now... In an Erich von Daniken kind of way, that is.

Anonymous said...

The torso is swiped from LEGO Alpha Team.